A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.

Microsoft took Alphabet’s spot as the world’s third most valuable company

40%

Microsoft added another $13 billion to its market cap last week, pushing the hardware, gaming, and software giant past Alphabet to become the world’s third-largest company.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Dado Ruvic
A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
40%

Microsoft’s market capitalization gained roughly 40% over the last 12 months, buoyed by successful software subscriptions and cloud computing growth.

A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
40%

From AI to services to gaming, Microsoft is surging in several sectors. It’s also predicted up to $29.5 billion in revenue for its fiscal fourth quarter—well above an expected $28.01 billion.

A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
40%

Tech giants are racing toward $1 trillion market cap

A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
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Among the “Big Four” tech companies, Amazon has pulled off a couple upsets of its own, taking Microsoft’s #3 spot in February and Alphabet’s #2 spot in March.

A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
40%

It seems all but certain that 2018 will be the year of the first trillion-dollar company—but Apple will probably get there first.

A man is silhouetted against a video screen with as he poses with a Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone in this photo illustration taken in the central Bosnian town of Zenica, September 3, 2013. Two years after hitching its fate to Microsoft's Windows Phone software, a withered Nokia collapsed into the arms of the U.S. software giant, agreeing to sell its main handset business for 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion). Nokia, which will continue as a maker of networking equipment and holder of patents, was once the world's dominant handset manufacturer but was long since overtaken by Apple and Samsung in the highly competitive market for more powerful smartphones.
40%

Microsoft is more valuable than Alphabet—by a small margin

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