Skyscrapers Oriental Pearl Tower and Jin Mao Tower (L) are seen from the Shanghai World Financial Center, in rain at the financial district of Pudong in Shanghai, China, January 28, 2016.

A power plant in Iceland is testing a technology that can capture carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into stone

50 tonnes

A geothermal power plant in Iceland is capable of capturing 50 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. The technology could become a powerful weapon against the gases that contribute most to global warming.

Published   |  Photo by Reuters/Aly Song
Skyscrapers Oriental Pearl Tower and Jin Mao Tower (L) are seen from the Shanghai World Financial Center, in rain at the financial district of Pudong in Shanghai, China, January 28, 2016.
50 tonnes

The power plant, located in Hellisheidi, close to Reykjavik, captures and injects carbon dioxide into basalt rocks underground, where it will be locked up for millions of years.

Skyscrapers Oriental Pearl Tower and Jin Mao Tower (L) are seen from the Shanghai World Financial Center, in rain at the financial district of Pudong in Shanghai, China, January 28, 2016.
50 tonnes

The project, operated by Switzerland’s Climeworks, is still a pilot, capturing a small quantity of carbon dioxide—only equivalent to the annual emissions of a single US household.

Skyscrapers Oriental Pearl Tower and Jin Mao Tower (L) are seen from the Shanghai World Financial Center, in rain at the financial district of Pudong in Shanghai, China, January 28, 2016.
50 tonnes

But the power plant proves that direct air capture, the technology used to capture and trap the carbon, could potentially be used to clean the 40 trillion kg of carbon dioxide we produce every year.

Published

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