A man is silhouetted while watching toward high rise buildings at Shinjuku shopping and entertainment district in in Tokyo, Friday, March 25, 2016.

Japan is trying to make its strict work culture a bit more flexible

10%

The Japanese government wants to increase the share of people that work from home once a week from 4% in 2015 to 10% in 2020.

Published   |  Photo by AP Photo/Koji Sasahara
A man is silhouetted while watching toward high rise buildings at Shinjuku shopping and entertainment district in in Tokyo, Friday, March 25, 2016.
10%

The government also wants to reduce the long working hours practiced in many Japanese firms. And incentivize companies to switch paper for electronic devices.

A man is silhouetted while watching toward high rise buildings at Shinjuku shopping and entertainment district in in Tokyo, Friday, March 25, 2016.
10%

The idea is to modernize the national work culture, so it can become more accessible (to mothers for instance) and productive.

A man is silhouetted while watching toward high rise buildings at Shinjuku shopping and entertainment district in in Tokyo, Friday, March 25, 2016.
10%

On July 24, some 930 companies in Japan allowed their employees to work from home. That campaign will be repeated yearly on that date until 2020.

A man is silhouetted while watching toward high rise buildings at Shinjuku shopping and entertainment district in in Tokyo, Friday, March 25, 2016.
10%

With that campaign, the government also wants people to get used to working remotely so they can do that during the Olympics in 2020, to reduce traffic congestion.

Published

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